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9/25 The Foreigner at PHAMALY

AUDITION NOTICE: THE FOREIGNER BY LARRY SHUE
PHAMALY THEATRE COMPANY will hold auditions for its January/February 2013 production of The Foreigner, written by Larry Shue and directed by Edith Weiss. Preliminary auditions will be held on Tuesday, September 25 from 6 pm – 9 pm by appointment only (call or email to schedule a time). There will also be a callback audition on Sunday, September 30 from 12-4pm. Both audition events will be held in Newman Center for Theatre Education( also known as the Tramway) at 1101 13th Street, Denver, adjacent to the Denver Performing Arts Complex. If actors cannot make either audition, it is possible to arrange for a private audition time – call for more information. The show will be presented at the Aurora Fox Arts Center January 17 – February 2, 2013 and at the Arvada Center for the Arts & Humanities February 22 – 24.

Needed are 7 physically and/or cognitively challenged men and women age range 18 – 65. Actors may be asked to provide doctor’s verification of disability. A complete character breakdown and show synopsis is included on page 2. Actors need to prepare one comedic monologue up to one minute in length. Selections from The Foreigner are discouraged. Resume and headshot are requested. All roles are currently available. Call or Email Bryce Alexander to schedule your audition time: 303.575.0005 or e-mail your request to balexander@phamaly.org.

Now entering its 24th season, Phamaly Theatre Company (formerly known as the Physically Handicapped Actors & Musical Artists League) is a nationally recognized, award winning Colorado Theatre Company. Phamaly’s mission is to provide professional theatre opportunities and artistic development for performers with disabilities, and to promote the inclusion of people with disabilities in the performing arts community. For more information go to http://www.phamaly.org

CHARACTER BREAKDOWN:

CHARLIE BAKER: Age range: 30’s to early 40’s. Should be able to speak with a British accent as well as other foreign accents. Should be willing to be fairly physical. Initially, Charlie is extremely shy, he considers himself “boring”, and wonders what it would be like to have a vibrant personality.

REVERAND DAVID MARSHALL LEE: Age range: Late 20’s to early 40’s. Should be able to speak with a southern accent. The fiancée of Catherine, and one of the main villains in the play.

STAFF SERGEANT “FROGGY” LESUEUR: Age range: 30’s to 50’s. Should be able to speak with a heavy British accent. Friend of Charlie’s, confident and sure of himself.

BETTY MEEKS: Age range: 40’s to 60’s. Should be able to speak with a thick Southern accent. Loving and zany personality. Thrilled with the prospect of having a “real, live foreigner” as her guest.

OWEN MUSSER: Age range: 30’s to 50’s. Should be able to speak with a thick southern accent. Neanderthal in nature and a very angry personality. One of the main villains in the play.

CATHERINE SIMMS: Age range: mid 20’s to 30’s. Should be able to speak with a Southern accent. Pretty young woman, engaged to David, unaware of his true, villainous character. Heiress to a very large inheritance. A bit of a whiner, somewhat sarcastic.

ELLARD SIMMS: Age range: 20’s. Should be able to speak with a Southern accent. Younger brother of Catherine. Insecure, considered by others to be mentally challenged.

NOTE: Additional roles to be cast for townspeople.

About the Play:
In a fishing lodge in rural Georgia, two English men, Froggy and Charlie, arrive as guests. Charlie in intensely shy—so much so that he cannot speak when meeting new people or in uncomfortable situations. Froggy introduces Charlie to his friends in the lodge as being from an exotic foreign country and does not speak or understand English, but the residents at the lodge try to talk to Charlie anyway. Like a fly on the wall, Charlie overhears more than he should about the scandalous and damaging revelations of the resort’s inhabitants. The nonstop hilarity of the play builds to an uproariously funny climax where events go awry for the “bad guys” and the “good guys” emerge triumphant.

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